Microsoft Relaunches Its Original 1994 Site On The Web

The low-resolution GIFs. The thoughtless use of fonts. The star map navigation grid. It’s Web 1.0 all over again!

Control This Art Museum's Robots From The Comfort Of Your Couch

In “After Dark,” Internet users around the world control a team of robots that livestream the Tate’s collections into the wee hours.

How The World's Craziest Video Game Is Changing MoMA

The Museum of Modern Art has had to change the way it preserves art thanks to a notoriously punishing game called Dwarf Fortress.

A Phenomenal Projection-Mapping Music Video Shot in a Single Take for Irma’s ‘Save Me’

by Christopher Jobson

With a never-ending procession of distressing events in the news lately, you might be in need for a substantial dose of something absurdly happy. If so, this new music video for Cameroonian singer-songwriter Irma will surely fit the bill. The video was created by French design house SuperBien and directed by Xavier Maingon and Marc-Antoine Hélard who opted to shoot the entire piece on a single soundstage with the use of 7 digital projectors. The shoot must have been a Herculean effort on behalf of the kids who had to rock it out for 20-25 takes before getting the final version. The song is “Save Me” off her 2014 album Faces. (via MotionworksBooooooom, and Jeff is right, this wins the award for most-fun-being-had-in-a-video)

thisiscolossal.com

Making the case for animation and interactivity
by Sara Sundqvist
From a design standpoint, we’re starting to think of apps more as interactive experiences and less as passive objects. This shift in mindset can largely be attributed to Apple’s iOS 7 overhaul, which emphasizes physics-driven animations. Since then, we’ve seen a slew of interesting animations work their way into some of the most popular apps.
With all the exciting motion UI elements out there, it’s easy to get caught up in the fun, while forgetting about the opportunity costs. On the other hand, spending the extra time on the right animations, for the right reasons, can increase usability, help define your brand’s personality, and create delight. In this post, we’ll examine animations and interactions implemented with purpose and consider whether they make sense for your brand.
uxmag.com

Making the case for animation and interactivity

by Sara Sundqvist

From a design standpoint, we’re starting to think of apps more as interactive experiences and less as passive objects. This shift in mindset can largely be attributed to Apple’s iOS 7 overhaul, which emphasizes physics-driven animations. Since then, we’ve seen a slew of interesting animations work their way into some of the most popular apps.

With all the exciting motion UI elements out there, it’s easy to get caught up in the fun, while forgetting about the opportunity costs. On the other hand, spending the extra time on the right animations, for the right reasons, can increase usability, help define your brand’s personality, and create delight. In this post, we’ll examine animations and interactions implemented with purpose and consider whether they make sense for your brand.

uxmag.com

Watch Jim Henson’s experimental animation “Drum West” from 1961

thefoxisblack.com

See classic artworks come to life in spellbinding “Beauty” video

Animator and filmmaker Rino Stefano Tagliafierro found inspiration in classical paintings, and found a way to share their emotional impact with the world.

fastcocreate.com

A thoughtful essay on the details of design by Craig Mod
by Bobby Solomon
I really hate the phrase “the devil’s in the detail” but I certainly appreciate it’s intention. As a designer and someone who regards aesthetics in all forms, the details are the key. When an object, or even an experience, gets all the details right and it’s a trans-formative experience. Good details surprise you, they excite you, and they elevate the bar of your personal taste.
Writer Craig Mod recently posted a poetic piece on Medium titled Let’s talk about margins, which relates the importance of details to book making. Funny enough, my favorite part of his piece isn’t about books, it’s about buildings.
"Consider buildings. Although you may not be an architect, you can be touched by a graceful space. The kind of space where you close your eyes and feel the gentle hand of the architect reveal itself in the way sound and air moves around you. Try it sometime. Go to your favorite space. Close your eyes and breathe slowly and intuit the goodness. Conversely, you can sense neglect or disregard the same way. There’s a building in Tokyo that feels like it hates the world. Standing in its shadow, the wind becomes portentous, howling, angry. It will swallow you if you close your eyes. It does not want you there. Its rotating doors even killed a child the first week it opened. It is not a nice building. You are not an architect but you know this: The building is bad. There are no George Hakashima chairs inside.
thefoxisblack.com

A thoughtful essay on the details of design by Craig Mod

by Bobby Solomon

I really hate the phrase “the devil’s in the detail” but I certainly appreciate it’s intention. As a designer and someone who regards aesthetics in all forms, the details are the key. When an object, or even an experience, gets all the details right and it’s a trans-formative experience. Good details surprise you, they excite you, and they elevate the bar of your personal taste.

Writer Craig Mod recently posted a poetic piece on Medium titled Let’s talk about margins, which relates the importance of details to book making. Funny enough, my favorite part of his piece isn’t about books, it’s about buildings.

"Consider buildings. Although you may not be an architect, you can be touched by a graceful space. The kind of space where you close your eyes and feel the gentle hand of the architect reveal itself in the way sound and air moves around you. Try it sometime. Go to your favorite space. Close your eyes and breathe slowly and intuit the goodness. Conversely, you can sense neglect or disregard the same way. There’s a building in Tokyo that feels like it hates the world. Standing in its shadow, the wind becomes portentous, howling, angry. It will swallow you if you close your eyes. It does not want you there. Its rotating doors even killed a child the first week it opened. It is not a nice building. You are not an architect but you know this: The building is bad. There are no George Hakashima chairs inside.

thefoxisblack.com

Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History

by Christopher Jobson

Art and Craft is a new feature documentary about art forger Mark Landis (previously) who is arguably one of the most prolific art forgers in US history, having tricked over 60 museums in 20 states into believing his masterfully created replicas are authentic artworks. The catch: so far, it appears Landis, who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic, has yet to commit a crime. While he’s caused headaches, confusion, and multi-year investigations, he has never sought to benefit or profit from his forgeries in any way. Instead, he enjoys donations of obscure artwork to art institutions, many of which unknowinly exhibited the fakes, allowing Landis the secret thrill of seeing his work on display.

thisiscolossal.com

Stunning animated GIFs will leave you mesmerized
GIFs have been taking over the internet for quite some time now and it’s easy to see why; showcasing illustrations, artworks and photography in a quick, animated succession is packed full of fun and inspiration. These animated GIFs from Carl Burton are simple, serene and absolutely stunning.
Working as an animator, 3D artist and illustrator, Burton has combined all of his expertise to create some really rather beautiful offerings. Inspired by everything from news stories to his surroundings, the colours and intricate animations make these GIFs stand out from the crowd.
If you love these GIFs just as much as we do, be sure to check Burton’s Vimeo channel as well as his official website, that features lots more GIFs as well as inspiring animation and more.
creativebloq.com

Stunning animated GIFs will leave you mesmerized

GIFs have been taking over the internet for quite some time now and it’s easy to see why; showcasing illustrations, artworks and photography in a quick, animated succession is packed full of fun and inspiration. These animated GIFs from Carl Burton are simple, serene and absolutely stunning.

Working as an animator, 3D artist and illustrator, Burton has combined all of his expertise to create some really rather beautiful offerings. Inspired by everything from news stories to his surroundings, the colours and intricate animations make these GIFs stand out from the crowd.

If you love these GIFs just as much as we do, be sure to check Burton’s Vimeo channel as well as his official website, that features lots more GIFs as well as inspiring animation and more.

creativebloq.com

50 fantastic freebies for web designers, August 2014

Has there ever been an industry as generous as the Web? Every hour of every day you’ll find the design community distributing the fruits of their labors for free; making the Web bigger and better all the time.

New projects are constantly being released that make us excited, curious, inspired and sometimes a little bit jealous. Today we’re showing you our favourite freebies this month. There are fonts, mockups, templates and more.

webdesignerdepot.com

14 Beautiful Content-Heavy Websites for Inspiration

Designing a good website that accommodates a lot of content is a tricky balancing act to pull off. Does one attempt to present the user with all the information in a clean, organized manner, or reveal it bit-by-bit, in an effort to create an engaging breadcrumb trail that tugs the user along the road to enlightenment? Get it wrong, and you risk overwhelming your visitors, who’ll then leave without retraining any part of what they just read. Get it right, though, and you’ll have gained a new audience member who not only understands your message, but also might just bring a few friends with them when they return.

dtelepathy.com/

Slide Show: What Google Maps Can’t See
by The New Yorker
Mishka Henner is a Manchester-based artist who is helping to redefine photography in the age of the Internet. For his project “Dutch Landscapes” (2011), Henner hovered over the Netherlands on Google Earth and took screen shots of sites that the Dutch government had stylistically censored for security reasons, including army barracks, fuel depots, and even royal palaces. Henner’s work can be viewed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Now You See It: Photography and Concealment” exhibition.

Slide Show: What Google Maps Can’t See

by The New Yorker

Mishka Henner is a Manchester-based artist who is helping to redefine photography in the age of the Internet. For his project “Dutch Landscapes” (2011), Henner hovered over the Netherlands on Google Earth and took screen shots of sites that the Dutch government had stylistically censored for security reasons, including army barracks, fuel depots, and even royal palaces. Henner’s work can be viewed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Now You See It: Photography and Concealment” exhibition.

5 top examples of editorial illustrations

These beautiful editorial illustrations pop from the pages, conveying the theme of the article perfectly.